The Duxbury Rural & Historical Society

Blogs

Drew Archival Library:
1662 Letter to Experience Mitchell: Drew Archives’ Oldest Document

The Drew Archives has many wonderful holdings, but the oldest by far is a letter written on July 24, 1662 to Experience Mitchell, one of Duxbury’s earliest settlers.  The letter, written in iron ga. […]

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Drew Archival Library:
The Fire That Burned the Weston Dynasty

Just after midnight on March 29,1850 an Irish servant in the employ of Gerhsom Bradford Weston awoke to the smell of smoke. After giving an alarm, she, along with the large Weston clan, ran from the h. […]

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Drew Archival Library:
Duxbury High School Interns Catalog Three New Collections

Over the past few years I have had the pleasure of working with and mentoring Duxbury High School interns.  Each semester two to four students come daily to the Drew Archives and assist in the cata. […]

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Drew Archival Library:
Imprinted on My Heart: The Unrequited Love of Sarah Freeman Sampson

At 9pm on the night of September 11, 1836, Sarah F. Sampson sat in her bedroom and wrote one last love letter to her cousin Jacob Smith, Jr. It was Jacob’s 25th birthday but she did not mention the. […]

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Drew Archival Library:
Author Greg Grandin coming to Drew Archives, March 29th at 3pm

From the acclaimed author of Fordlandia, comes the story of a remarkable slave rebellion that illuminates America’s struggle with slavery and freedom during the Age of Revolution and beyond. Greg Gr. […]

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Drew Archival Library:
PHOTO GALLERY/VIDEO: Duxbury Rural and Historical Society leads tour of Mayflower Cemetery

PHOTO GALLERY/VIDEO: Duxbury Rural and Historical Society leads tour of Mayflower Cemetery.

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Duxbury in the Civil War:
Civil War Relics: Tribute and Legacy

by Erin McGough, Collections Manager Last year, DRHS pulled from a bureau drawer in the Gershom Bradford house a small wooden trinket box containing a number of Civil War relics, previously uncatalogu. […]

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Drew Archival Library:
First Hand Account of USSC’s Role at Gettysburg

The Drew Archives is very fortunate to house the large Bradford Family Collection – a collection that, I may have mentioned once or twice before, contains thousands of items and spans over two hundr. […]

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Duxbury in the Civil War:
Hurry Up and Wait . . .

  July 8, 1863 – “…marched to Middleton…” July 9, 1863 – “…marched again across the mountain toward Antietam…” July 10, 1863 – “…Marched to the Creek …” July 11, 1863 . […]

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Drew Archival Library:
New Acquisition of Rev. John Allyn’s Sermons

In a town as old as Duxbury, there are many men and women who can claim a prominent place in its history.  Founders such as John and Priscilla Alden; shipbuilders Ezra “King Caesar” Weston I and. […]

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Duxbury in the Civil War:
A Duxbury GAR Ceremonial Bugle

by Erin McGough, Collections Manager Reveille. Assembly. Drill Call. Call to Quarters. Tattoo. And at the very end, Taps. During the Civil War, the call of the bugle sounded out the structure to a sol. […]

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Duxbury in the Civil War:
The “Division” of Duxbury: Soldiering and Temperance

by Carolyn Ravenscroft, Archivist The Confederate army was not the only enemy being fought during the Civil War. For some, demon alcohol was an even bigger foe. Having a drink or two or three in the l. […]

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Duxbury in the Civil War:
Assault on Port Hudson, a Terrible Fight for Duxbury Soldiers

The second Union assault on Port Hudson, Louisiana took place 150 years ago today on June 14, 1863. It was, in hindsight, a hopeless and reckless assault for those Federal troops that attacked the for. […]

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Duxbury in the Civil War:
Charlotte Bradford, Part Three: Matron of the Home for Soldiers

by Carolyn Ravenscroft This is the third installment in a series of articles describing Charlotte Bradford’s career as a nurse during the Civil War. Previous articles discussed her work aboard the U. […]

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Duxbury in the Civil War:
The Political Battle for Duxbury Soldier’s Bounties

One of the more perplexing episodes in Duxbury’s Civil War history (and a lengthy one at that) was the matter of the bounties that were promised to the first group of Duxbury men who enlisted in Ma. […]

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Duxbury in the Civil War:
Watertown Arsenal

by Erin McGough, Collections Manager Some weeks ago, I chose to highlight two artifacts relating to the Watertown Arsenal for my next contribution to our “Duxbury in the Civil War” blog. Now, in t. […]

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Duxbury in the Civil War:
“Dear Mother and Father:” Civil War Letter Writing

by Alison Arnold For a soldier in the Civil War, letter writing was the main form of communication with loved ones at home and helped to relieve the tedium of camp life. Almost all soldiers begged. […]

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Duxbury in the Civil War:
Duxbury Soldiers in the Bayous

By March 1863, 150 years ago this month, about 162 men from Duxbury had enlisted to serve in the Union Army. We have, in this blog, frequently discussed the Duxbury men who belonged to the 18th Massac. […]

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Drew Archival Library:
The Day the Cable Came to Town

Many of you are no doubt are familiar with the Landing of the French Atlantic Cable in Duxbury in 1869, but for those of you who have never heard the tale, gather ‘round… Once upon a time, before. […]

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Drew Archival Library:
How Myles Standish Lost His Head

Myles Standish was known to have a hot temper but it was not until 1922[1] that he truly lost his head.  Shortly after noon on a sultry August day an electrical storm caused lightning to strike the 1. […]

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